11 Nov

The 3 Components of Job Satisfaction – Can there Be Only Three? Read On… from Michael Hyatt

The 3 Components of Job Satisfaction -(With Post from Michael Hyatt) Can there Be Only Three?

job-and-career-satisfaction

    I remember what catalyzed a definite move into training and organizational development for me. A lifelong commitment which has personal development and growing effective people at the core of all I do.
    It happened at Telerik, a Bulgarian startup software company that exploded in profitability and was acquired by Progress Software for $262.5 million in the summer of 2005.
    I was part of one of the product teams working as a Quality Assurance technician. Our Product and Team Leader at the time, decided to engage and motivate the team to share knowledge and inspire each other.
    He suggested presenting short training talks on different topics he assigned and other colleagues from other teams were also invited.
    Our team was responsible for eight of the company’s software products and we worked in development cycles for three major quarterly releases a year, so it was as dynamic as it gets in a software company. My task was a presentation on the Selenium testing framework and its significance to our work in product development.
    I was so on fire preparing the presentation which kept me up late and almost but sold the software, its purpose, usefulness and importance in our product releases and customer satisfaction.
    As I ended the talk, surprising and rewarding applause filled the room from the whole team with visitors from other teams joining in.
    I felt like I had tapped into something that had been there the whole time. I was really good at presenting, educating, inspiring, motivating and getting people to want to take action.
    I felt I was in the zone and it was like stepping outside of myself while I flowed with such energy and certainty for the time it lasted.
    As we exchanged niceties after the talk, a team-mate asked me: “What on earth are you doing dealing with Software instead of doing what you just did”.
    Someone else said:

    Since then, I’ve built a successful career helping individuals, leaders and teams to attract, develop and unleash learning agility as effective people and teams.
    I’ve enjoyed the journey and turned learning and development into a profitable and enjoyable craft while working with leaders and teams in Europe and the US.

    I just read an article by Michael Hyatt titled: “The 3 Components of Job Satisfaction “and wanted to share this as soon as I could.
    It so resonates with what I’ve seen in over 8 years helping people and teams grow careers and results, summarized in these few principles.

    There are many principles around success but these three really narrow down the essentials.
    Here’s a link and the content is below. Enjoy:
    A few years ago, a woman approached me after I finished a keynote presentation. In the speech, I had mentioned the importance of living with intention.

    That point made an impression. She realized she had not been intentional, particularly as it related to her career.
    As it turns out, she was a doctor with a very successful practice. She was extremely busy and making more money than she had dreamed possible. But she was deeply unsatisfied.
    “If I’m honest, I think I became a doctor because my father was a doctor. It was expected. I didn’t think I had a choice,” she confessed. Then her eyes welled with tears.
    “But I hate it,” she continued. “I only get to spend a few minutes with each patient. I feel like a factory worker on a conveyor belt. It’s all I can do to make myself go to work.”
    She was good at what she did. Her practice was exploding. But she had lost her passion.

    As I later reflected on her situation, I realized job satisfaction requires three components.
    1. Passion. This is where it begins. What do you care about? What moves you? What problems do you want to solve or issues you want to address? If your heart is not in your work, you have a job but not a calling.
    2. Proficiency. Passion alone is not enough. You have to be good at what you do. Being good enough will not give you the satisfaction you desire. You have to excel at your craft and be awesome. Mastery is the goal.
    3. Profitability. To enjoy a successful career, people must be willing to pay you for what you do. You don’t have to get rich, but there must be a market for your product or service. Otherwise, your career is not sustainable.
    If you have all three of these components, you can experience genuine career satisfaction. Few things in life are more rewarding.
    I envision it as three overlapping circles. (Jim Collins has a similar model in Good to Great as it applies to companies.) At the intersection of all three is true success.

    But that can’t work forever. If you want to succeed at the deepest level, you must eventually incorporate all three components.
    Few things in life are more rewarding than marketable work fueled by passion and competence. Michael Hyatt

    A while back I heard from a doctor in a similar situation as the one from before. She worked for a major corporate practice. It was like a factory with patients on a conveyor belt.
    She hated it. She had zero passion for her job. So she quit!
    She started a boutique family practice of her own. Instead of the constant pressure to see more patients each day than the last, she now has fewer patients and can spend more time with each.
    And guess what? She’s reconnected with her passion and loving her work again. That’s the kind of difference being intentional about our careers can make.
    Question: Do you possess all three of these components? Which is missing?
    What could you do to become more satisfied in your work? You can leave a comment below to engage in the conversation.